Sean's '59 Panel

toolbox
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Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by toolbox » Wed Mar 06, 2019 12:26 pm

Dual Port wrote:
Wed Mar 06, 2019 10:26 am
Ken wrote:
Wed Mar 06, 2019 9:45 am
Nice work guys. I have a minor mis-alignment problem on the 68 SC. Your work will be helpful in correcting the problem. :D
Your '68 will have IRS, if your alignment problem is in the back all of this does not apply.

:mrgreen:
Probably bad trailing arm bushings.

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Ken
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Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by Ken » Thu Mar 07, 2019 11:05 am

Thanks for the reply, my problem is in the front. After I replaced both front tie rods, the front end tends to wander and/or pull to either side. It is probably an alignment issue.
1963 Single Cab
1964 Bowman & Sons Camper (Vegas Bus)
1966 Westy S0-42 Hardtop
1967 Westy SO-42 Pop Top
1968 Single Cab

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Six Volt
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Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by Six Volt » Mon Mar 25, 2019 8:47 pm

Bruce and I were back at it today. It was a really good day and Bruce really stepped up and took care of some issues I was frustrated over.

First, no matter how much I read or think I know, I've now learned there are almost always issues when upgrading components between years. Case in point: Big nut trans with RGB's in an early split.

The wheel wells on an early split are far smaller than later splits. Add in 15" radial wheels (195R15) and the bigger brakes and you've got "fit" issues getting the rear wheels on and off. Add in the replacement brake cables being too long and the need to cut them short, means: "Oh yea, that'll bolt right in" isn't always the truth.

Bruce is better at the geometry than I am, but I do understand it now that I've been there for it on two occasions. Getting just the right height for access and the right camber for driveability takes some work, but it paid off in the end.

During the course of this upgrade I picked up a "swedge kit" to shorten the cables so they (hopefully) work in an emergency. I got the tip from Aaron (Widefive) and a guy that goes by the name "Glideking" on the samba. He recommended an aircraft supply house who sold a nice little kit with 3/32 swedges that work well with our sized brake cables.

The good news is the kit came with plety of swedges, so if you need to try this in the future I've likely got you covered.

To give you an appreciation of "fit," here's one of Bruce's 185/14 Hankook's next to one of my Thialand 195/15 radials. You wouldn't believe how much bigger these tires are without seeing them next to each other.
IMG_3236.jpg
The swedge kit is pretty straighforwarded. We doubled it like Glideking did and it fit nicely. Here are a few pics.
IMG_3237.jpg
IMG_3238.jpg
IMG_3239.jpg
IMG_3241.jpg
It's me, Sean
1957 Beetle Oval Sedan 36 Horse 6 volt
1959 Panel 40 Horse 6 volt
1978 Transporter - 6 volts too many!

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Karl Kombi
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Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by Karl Kombi » Tue Mar 26, 2019 8:47 am

Can you get your tires/wheels to squeeze in OK now? :?

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Six Volt
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Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by Six Volt » Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:55 am

Sure can :D
It's me, Sean
1957 Beetle Oval Sedan 36 Horse 6 volt
1959 Panel 40 Horse 6 volt
1978 Transporter - 6 volts too many!

WideFive
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Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by WideFive » Tue Mar 26, 2019 1:59 pm

Keep werking on it, we leave for CTS in 52 days!
"There is no restoration process that can give a car legitimacy equal to originality."

chuckspence
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Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by chuckspence » Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:49 pm

if any member need to swage cables I do have a complete set of Nicopress crimpers that they could borrow...

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Six Volt
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Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by Six Volt » Tue Mar 26, 2019 8:52 pm

WideFive wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 1:59 pm
Keep werking on it, we leave for CTS in 52 days!
Swing by and pick me up! :D
Screen Shot 2019-03-26 at 8.51.20 PM.png
Screen Shot 2019-03-26 at 8.51.20 PM.png (38.67 KiB) Viewed 105 times
It's me, Sean
1957 Beetle Oval Sedan 36 Horse 6 volt
1959 Panel 40 Horse 6 volt
1978 Transporter - 6 volts too many!

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Six Volt
Posts: 3366
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 7:25 am

Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by Six Volt » Tue Mar 26, 2019 8:57 pm

chuckspence wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:49 pm
if any member need to swage cables I do have a complete set of Nicopress crimpers that they could borrow...
I should have known. :lol: I guess I wasted $50. :oops:
It's me, Sean
1957 Beetle Oval Sedan 36 Horse 6 volt
1959 Panel 40 Horse 6 volt
1978 Transporter - 6 volts too many!

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Dual Port
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Joined: Fri Apr 30, 2010 10:06 am

Re: Sean's '59 Panel

Post by Dual Port » Tue Mar 26, 2019 10:36 pm

Resetting the camber went smoothly because everything was just apart. Sean helped, we were rushing and I didn't take any pictures so I'll recycle some old ones from my busses to explain:

Measure camber of the tire on a level surface, I measure each wheel/tire 6 ways and take an average of the 6. The inner hub of the wheel seems to be the most accurate. The picture shows the outer wheel rim measuring .8° positive.
PC110010.JPG
Sean's measured about .5° positive on each wheel which is where I like it on '64-7 busses but it makes tire install tough on early busses because the fenderwell is 1.5" lower.


Rack it, burp the bolts, pull the shocks and brake cables, pretty straightforward.

Loosen the spring plates and make your initial baseline measurement. Many guys use dial angle finders but I hate them, too sloppy for my needs.
P2100017.JPG
I find a digital one much more accurate.
P2100018.JPG

Here's the note sheet I was using on Sean's- his wheel camber measured .5° on each wheel and he wanted to go to 2.5° positive on each wheel to get more ride height and tire access. A few years ago I figured out that wheel camber is relative to spring plate angle by a figure of about 1.24. That means to change wheel camber 1° you need to change spring plate angle 1.24°. I came up with this ratio by dividing the effective length of the spring plate by the effective length of the axle.
After the right spring plate was loosened, pulled off the stop and wiggled to get it to settle down, I got a baseline measurement of 18.5°. Sean wanted to increase his camber from .5° to 2.5° which is an increase of 2°. Simple math- multiply the 2° desired change x 1.24 gives you 2.48° increase in angle. His baseline was 18.50° so it's simple- add 2.48 to get the desired spring plate angle. You'll see in my scribble the target is 20.98 or 21° on the spring plate. To give myself some leeway I allow .2° each way from target which means I'll accept 20.8° to 21.2° . I pop the spring plate off and twist the torsion bar randomly until I get in my target window. This is actually pretty quick, within 5 minutes I'll be in the window which is 10-20 tries of the splines. Sean's wheels measure 2.5° on each side when done, perfect.
P3270037.JPG
Every time I've used this equation it's been spot on. And to think I was kicked out of Geometry class in high school!

:mrgreen:
Bruce Amacker
'66 Deluxe Bus
'65 Standard Bus

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