Stuff at the Shop

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Dual Port
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Joined: Fri Apr 30, 2010 10:06 am

Re: Stuff at the Shop

Post by Dual Port » Thu Dec 13, 2018 11:41 am

The 1600SP went smoothly, here's the case ready to mate together. The crank looked great to begin with but I polished it using a drill to spin it and 1000 grit, it looked like a mirror when done. The bearings are marked and "lined" to make sure they're seated correctly on the dowels, the case flanges are cleaned and gooped with sealer and it's already been dry-fit to make sure everything spins free.
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Here's the short block done, it spins freely with zero effort.
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I've been drilling an extra drain hole in the case to relieve pressure on the rear seal, the hole should be at 6 o'clock and the Germans put it at 8 o'clock for some reason. This leaves an ounce of oil against the lip of the seal when the car is parked and sometimes ends up on the driveway.
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The heads had less than 1000 miles since last ground, I disassembled them.....
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And blasted everything. I don't like the "valve grinding compounds" sold lately for lapping as they're too coarse and make little grooves in the valve face and seat, it's like sand in a paste carrier. I tried using rubbing compound this time and it worked great. (you can see a bit of it in the tub in the left background) I used a power drill running really slow and reversed directions a lot, maybe 2-3 seconds at a time and refreshed the compound.
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Parts done and ready to assemble, German jugs ball honed and checked, no wear or out-of-round measurable. Pistons soda blasted and re-ringed. Heads assembled and ready to go.
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I always air check heads as soon as they go on to make sure everything is air tight. The compound must have worked well as there was not a bit of leakage.
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Long block done.
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Oil system complete and priming, I was able to get 40psi cranking. Note the spark plugs and rocker shafts are off to relieve pressure, the engine spins very free like this to build oil pressure. You can see the "4" written on top of the piston and the notches in each jug to match- 4 notches on #4 jug, 3 on 3. I only use engine oil as an assembly lube, no fancy greases or assembly lubes.
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Runs perfect and great oil pressure, I use a really thin oil initially on the stand (like 0w-20) while the rings seat in for a few hours and then change to 0w-40 Mobil 1. I'm not finishing the sheet metal trim on this engine because I don't know what it's going into, that's why there's VGs on the heat riser pipes.
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Bruce Amacker
'66 Deluxe Bus
'65 Standard Bus

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Six Volt
Posts: 3422
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 7:25 am

Re: Stuff at the Shop

Post by Six Volt » Thu Dec 13, 2018 9:04 pm

I stoppd by when the engine was running. Sounded really smooth. The best part was seeing Bruce's "exhaust removal and dissipation system" in use. :P
It's me, Sean
1957 Beetle Oval Sedan 36 Horse 6 volt
1959 Panel 40 Horse 6 volt

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Karl Kombi
Posts: 167
Joined: Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:56 am

Re: Stuff at the Shop

Post by Karl Kombi » Thu Dec 13, 2018 9:08 pm

I've seen that exhaust scavenging system -- magnificent engineering!

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Dual Port
Posts: 1124
Joined: Fri Apr 30, 2010 10:06 am

Re: Stuff at the Shop

Post by Dual Port » Wed Apr 10, 2019 10:18 am

I thought I'd post this to give you guys something to look at. I've been pressure testing cylinders for a long time, as soon as I bolt the heads on I apply air and listen for leaks. A couple of times I've had valves that weren't seating and the head had to come off and go back to the machinist. I thought it wouldn't be hard to make up a jig to do this before the engine is assembled and I have plenty of junk parts, so have at it. In school we vacuum checked valves but I think shop air is much more effective.

Take an old jug, knock the fins off of it with an air hammer, weld some head studs to it, bolt a piston in with a ring, seal it with RTV, and voila! I have a hillbilly test jig to make sure the valves seat. The welds aren't as bad as they look, and if you can't weld good, weld a lot. :mrgreen: There's a lot of force on the piston (like 1700 lbs if I use full shop air) so the bolts go through the steel reinforcements in the skirts. I have a shutoff valve in the airline right next to my bench so I start with low pressure and work my way up if everything is tight, and I'm not hovering over it during testing. ;) That piston would probably leave a mark if it got loose.

I was going through some heads that had low mileage- TRW valves, tight guides, good looking seats. Clean everything, lap the valves, check contact with bluing and pressure test them, they're totally airtight.
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Stop laughing!
Bruce Amacker
'66 Deluxe Bus
'65 Standard Bus

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Karl Kombi
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Joined: Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:56 am

Re: Stuff at the Shop

Post by Karl Kombi » Wed Apr 10, 2019 10:40 am

"That piston would probably leave a mark if it got loose."

That stings when that happens... :P
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